Chips By Aug. 29, 2014 7:28 am
MIT student creates Jolt, a real-time head sensor that detects concussions | Chips | Geek.com

Anyone who partakes in contact sports has a chance of suffering from a concussion if their head is subjected to the right type of trauma. The problem is, concussions are easy to treat but hard to detect, and rely on the sufferer noticing something is wrong. If they don’t and further trauma is experienced, the result can be a more serious brain injury. That’s where the Jolt Sensor comes in.

MIT student Ben Harvatine developed the Jolt Sensor after suffering a concussion during wrestling practice. He didn’t know he had a concussion and continued to wrestle until he felt dizzy from further impacts and damage to his brain. Ben got lucky, but his recovery from the concussion took far longer than the typical 3 weeks of rest and monitoring.

Jolt aims to stop that happening by offering a way to monitor head impacts in real-time. It takes the form of a small, wireless waterproof rechargeable sensor that can be attached to any piece of head-worn sporting equipment. It monitors acceleration, and if it detects dangerous (brain damaging) movement it vibrates to inform the wearer that they may have a concussion. It can also be linked to a mobile app, allowing everyone on a team to be monitored from the sidelines and action taken as soon as a dangerous head trauma is reported.

Such instant feedback has the potential to avoid serious brain injuries, and Ben has turned to Kickstarter to raise the funding to make it happen. He’s asking for $60,000, which is enough to test the prototype, develop the mobile applications, and manufacture the sensor.

MIT student creates Jolt, a real-time head sensor that detects concussions | Chips | Geek.com

Early birds can secure a sensor for $80, but $100 is the normal price. Alternatively you can get a family pack of 3 for $275 and a team pack of 20 for $1,800. That’s not overly expensive considering what it does, and this is sure to be a popular buy for parents and sports teams alike.

With 28 days of the Kickstarter campaign still to go and $14,000 already raised, it seems likely the Jolt Sensor will get funded. Even if it falls short, it’s such a good idea I can see one of the major sports brands getting in touch with Ben and making sure it comes to market.

MIT student creates Jolt, a real-time head sensor that detects concussions | Chips | Geek.com

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